"Don’t mock people for the things that make them happy."

birdasaurus (via perfect)

(via waiting-on-the-goldrush)

"Your life is not an episode of Skins. Things will never look quite as good as they do in a faded, sun-drenched Polaroid; your days are not an editorial from Lula. Your life is not a Sofia Coppola movie, or a Chuck Palahniuk novel, or a Charles Bukowski poem. Grace Coddington isn’t your creative director. Bon Iver and Joy Division don’t play softly in the background at appropriate moments. Your hysterical teenage diary isn’t a work of art. Your room probably isn’t Selby material. Your life isn’t a Tumblr screencap. Every word that comes out of your mouth will not be beautiful and poignant, infinitely quotable. Your pain will not be pretty. Crying till you vomit is always shit. You cannot romanticize hurt. Or sadness. Or loneliness. You will have homework, and hangovers and bad hair days. The train being late won’t lead to any fateful encounters, it will make you late. Sometimes your work will suck. Sometimes you will suck. Far too often, everything will suck - and not in a Wes Anderson kind of way. And there is no divine consolation - only the knowledge that we will hopefully experience the full spectrum - and that sometimes, just sometimes, life will feel like a Coppola film."

— Letters From Nowhere (via vervelig)

(via waiting-on-the-goldrush)

creepy or cool i can’t tell

creepy or cool i can’t tell

(Source: primateculture, via sharpless)

eatsleepdraw:

http://raywangart.wordpress.com/
As someone with an egg allergy, I am 100% reblogging this for myself.

As someone with an egg allergy, I am 100% reblogging this for myself.

(Source: veganfoody, via innocentlyobscene)

psychotherapy:

by Alex Williams

It was like one of those magical blind-date scenes out of a Hollywood rom-com, without the “rom.” I met Brian, a New York screenwriter, a few years ago through work, which led to dinner with our wives and friend chemistry that was instant and obvious.

We liked the same songs off Dylan’s “Blonde on Blonde,” the same lines from “Chinatown.” By the time the green curry shrimp had arrived, we were finishing each other’s sentences. Our wives were forced to cut in: “Hey, guys, want to come up for air?”

As Brian and his wife wandered off toward the No. 2 train afterward, it crossed my mind that he was the kind of guy who might have ended up a groomsman at my wedding if we had met in college.

That was four years ago. We’ve seen each other four times since. We are “friends,” but not quite friends. We keep trying to get over the hump, but life gets in the way.

Our story is not unusual. In your 30s and 40s, plenty of new people enter your life, through work, children’s play dates and, of course, Facebook. But actual close friends — the kind you make in college, the kind you call in a crisis — those are in shorter supply.

As people approach midlife, the days of youthful exploration, when life felt like one big blind date, are fading. Schedules compress, priorities change and people often become pickier in what they want in their friends.

No matter how many friends you make, a sense of fatalism can creep in: the period for making B.F.F.’s, the way you did in your teens or early 20s, is pretty much over. It’s time to resign yourself to situational friends: K.O.F.’s (kind of friends) — for now.

But often, people realize how much they have neglected to restock their pool of friends only when they encounter a big life event, like a move, say, or a divorce.

That thought struck Lisa Degliantoni, an educational fund-raising executive in Chicago, a few months ago when she was planning her 39th birthday party. After a move from New York to Evanston, Ill., she realized that she had 857 Facebook friends and 509 Twitter followers, but still did not know if she could fill her party’s invitation list. “I did an inventory of the phases of my life where I’ve managed to make the most friends, and it was definitely high school and my first job,” she said.

After a divorce in his 40s, Robert Glover, a psychotherapist in Bellevue, Wash., realized that his roster of friends had quietly atrophied for years as he focused on career and family. “All of a sudden, with your wife out of the picture, you realize you’re lonely,” said Dr. Glover, now 56. “I’d go to salsa lessons. Instead of trying to pick up the women, I’d introduce myself to the men: ‘Hey, let’s go get a drink.’ ”

In studies of peer groups, Laura L. Carstensen, a psychology professor who is the director of the Stanford Center on Longevity in California, observed that people tended to interact with fewer people as they moved toward midlife, but that they grew closer to the friends they already had.

Basically, she suggests, this is because people have an internal alarm clock that goes off at big life events, like turning 30. It reminds them that time horizons are shrinking, so it is a point to pull back on exploration and concentrate on the here and now. “You tend to focus on what is most emotionally important to you,” she said, “so you’re not interested in going to that cocktail party, you’re interested in spending time with your kids.”

As external conditions change, it becomes tougher to meet the three conditions that sociologists since the 1950s have considered crucial to making close friends: proximity; repeated, unplanned interactions; and a setting that encourages people to let their guard down and confide in each other, said Rebecca G. Adams, a professor of sociology and gerontology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. This is why so many people meet their lifelong friends in college, she added…

(read the full article here)

unseelieangel:

if you’re ever really sad you should probably go look at cake wrecks. your life won’t improve or anything but you’ll probably be too busy trying to decide why the word “ultrasound” is suddenly so funny to you to remember why you were sad, at least for a little while

(via sharpless)

ladyleigh89:

Kumail Nanjiani - Beta Male

(via sharpless)

huffingtonpost:

STYLIST WHO SPENDS EVERY SUNDAY CUTTING HAIR FOR HOMELESS: ‘EVERY HUMAN LIFE IS WORTH THE SAME’

Mark Bustos is a hair stylist at an upscale salon in New York City, but not all of his clientele have to be wealthy to get a quality trim. Sometimes, they don’t need a penny.

For more photos of Busto’s work and more about his inspirational story go here. 

(via sharpless)

benedictusantonius:

The militarization of police in the US in recent decades has me thinking about this quote from Battlestar Galactica.

(via sharpless)

mdthwomp:

Unfriendly reminder that in America it’s reasonable to say an unarmed black kid deserved to be shot six times because he might have robbed a convenience store, but a white kid shouldn’t be kicked off the high school football team just because he violently raped a girl.

(via sharpless)

Holy crap! Just finished the first episode of The Knick and it is going to remain on my watch list! If you’re interested in a raw period drama and don’t mind watching blood pouring out of a human body, maybe even finding something disturbingly fascinating about it, then watch this show!

(Source: youtube.com)

"I heard a joke once: Man goes to doctor. Says he’s depressed. Says life is harsh and cruel. Says he feels all alone in a threatening world. Doctor says, “Treatment is simple. The great clown Pagliacci is in town tonight. Go see him. That should pick you up.” Man bursts into tears. Says, “But doctor… I am Pagliacci.” Good joke. Everybody laugh. Roll on snare drum."

— Rorschach, The Watchmen (via americananimal)

(via sharpless)

bearhatalice:

necturusmaculosus:

busket:

stunningpicture:

Perfectly timed wedding photo

so she’s marrying a shark in disguise right


when will my reflection showwho i aminside

Nobody suspects a thing


Reblogging for the Reflection quote.

bearhatalice:

necturusmaculosus:

busket:

stunningpicture:

Perfectly timed wedding photo

so she’s marrying a shark in disguise right

when will my reflection show

who i am

inside

Nobody suspects a thing

Reblogging for the Reflection quote.

(via wilwheaton)